Last edited by Arashijin
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

1 edition of Hawaiian legends index. found in the catalog.

Hawaiian legends index.

Hawaiian legends index.

  • 204 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Hawaii Library Association in Honolulu, Hawaii .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Hawaii
    • Subjects:
    • Hawaii. State Library Branch. Hawaii and the Pacific Section -- Catalogs.,
    • Legends -- Hawaii -- Indexes.,
    • Legends -- Hawaii -- Bibliography -- Catalogs.

    • Edition Notes

      ContributionsChing, Lillian, 1924-, Hawaii Library Association., Hawaii. State Library Branch. Hawaii and the Pacific Section.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsZ5984.U62 H384 1976, GR110.H38 H384 1976
      The Physical Object
      Pagination508 p. ;
      Number of Pages508
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3904319M
      LC Control Number81466837

      Hawaiian Legends for Little Ones, Maui Hooks the Islands introduces kids ages to one of Hawaii's best-known legends about Maui the demigod who fished up the Hawaiian islands using a magic fishing hook. In simple, poetic language, this origin story gives small kids a taste of Hawaii 5/5(11). The Hawaiian culture and heritage are passed on to the new generations through an elaborate collection of stories. These myths and legends tell the stories of the Hawaiian gods and the history of the Island.

      The Legend Behind Hawaii’s Goddess of Fire Lighting up ancient Hawaiian legends, Pele (pronounced peh-leh) the goddess of fire, lightning, wind, dance and volcanoes is a well-known character. Otherwise known as ka wahine ai honua, the woman who devours the land, Pele’s home is believed to be Halemaumau crater at the summit of Kilauea, one. Ulukau: The Hawaiian Electronic Library. E like hoʻi me ka loaʻa honua mai o ka 'ʻike akua' i ke kanaka e noho ulukau ʻia ana, pēia hoʻi ka loaʻa o ka ʻike kūhohonu i ke kanaka nāna e hoʻoikaika ana i ka heluhelu a ka lohe i nā ʻōlelo o kēia papahana waihona puke uila.

      These 9 Fascinating Stories Of Hawaiian Mythology Will Leave You Shaking Your Head In Awe. Like many indigenous peoples, the ancient Hawaiians felt a deep connection to the aina (land), and used stories of their gods and goddesses to explain everything from lava flows to the creation of the Hawaiian . Hawaiian legends are passed down for generations, and the legend of the night marchers is no different. Ask any Hawaii resident, and they will surely be able to recount a tale – maybe even one of an uncle or “aunty” who saw the legendary spirits themselves. Night marchers, known as huaka’i pō in the Hawaiian language, are death-dealing.


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Hawaiian legends index Download PDF EPUB FB2

- Books Indexed - Citation Format - About This Index - Access to CopiesIndex created by: Hawaiʻi State Library South King St. Honolulu, HI Hawaiʻi & Pacific Section () Database and web pages created and maintained by: University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Library McCarthy Mall Honolulu, HI Hawaiian.

Hawaiian Legends Index Back to Subject Browse. YOU SEARCHED FOR: The Subject: Pueo (Owl God) Your search retrieved 12 references. Results are displayed in order by Subject, Source, Legend. Subject: Pueo (owl god) appears in the legend: "Ka'ili and the Owl" in the book: Lyons, Barbara, Fire and Water, and Other Hawaiian legends on pages: Hawaiian Legends Index Back to Subject Browse.

YOU SEARCHED FOR: The Subject: Kaililauokekoa Your search retrieved 6 references. Results are displayed in order by Subject, Source, Legend. Subject: Kaililauokekoa appears in the legend: "The Magic Pipes" in the book: Green, Laura S., Folk-Tales from Hawaii on pages: HSL Call Number: RH This is the last of Westervelt's six books of Hawaiian lore.

Starting in mythological times, and retelling some of the migration legends, the book primarily focuses on the period of European contact, Hawaiian Historical Legends is of interest for anyone studying encounters between cultures, particularly where one of the cultures has a technological advantage.

Hawaiian Legends Index Back to Subject Browse. YOU SEARCHED FOR: The Subject: Kaikilani Your search retrieved 8 references. Results are displayed in order by Subject, Source, Legend. Subject: Kaikilani appears in the legend: "Kihapiilani " in the book: Fornander, Abraham, Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Antiquities and Folk-Lore, Volume 4.

Hawaiian Legends Index Back to Subject Browse. YOU SEARCHED FOR: The Subject: Hawaiian legends index. book (Polynesian Deity) Your search retrieved 61 references. Results are displayed in order by Subject, Source, Legend.

Hawaiian Legends Index Back to Subject Browse. YOU SEARCHED FOR: The Subject: Waianae, Oahu Your search retrieved 52 references. Results are Hawaiian legends index.

book in order by Subject, Source, Legend. Hawaiian Legends Index Back to Subject Browse. YOU SEARCHED FOR: The Subject: Kamohoalii Your search retrieved 31 references. Results are displayed in order by Subject, Source, Legend.

The book covers every significant theme in Hawaiian mythology, from the origin myths of the Hawaiian gods and goddesses, to more recent legends of star-crossed lovers. She also covers such topics as Kahunas (sorcerors) and Menehunes (fairies).

Hawaiian Folk Tales is one of a number of excellent period books available on this subject, and with a few exceptions, does not attempt to overly romanticize or impose western narrative structure.

It makes entertaining reading both for visitors and residents of the Hawaiian islands. Hawaii is full of myths and legends - stories that are full of passion, betrayal, loyalty, birth and death. According to W.D. Westervelt, one of the most famed re-tellers of Hawaiian myths and legends back in the early s, some of these myths and legends were very similar to the stories told in Tahiti, Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand and other islands in the Pacific Ocean.

appears in the legend: "The Legend of the Rolling Head" in the book: Knudsen, Eric A., Teller of Hawaiian Tales on pages: HSL Call Number: H K UHM Call Number: GRK59 Subject: Akua appears in the legend: "The One-Eyed Akua" in the book: Knudsen, Eric A., Teller of Hawaiian Tales on pages: HSL Call Number: H K.

HAWAIIAN LEGENDS Of OLD HONOLULU. by W. WESTERVELT. Boston, G.H. Ellis Press [] Title Page Foreword Table of Contents Introduction Pronunciation I. The Migration of the Hawaiians II. Legendary Places In Honolulu III. The God of Pakaka Temple IV.

Legend of the Bread-Fruit Tree V. The Gods Who Found Water. Book Covers [ Original Images ] [ Expand Contents ] Front Matter [ Original Images ] [ Expand Contents ] Chap. 1 PĪKOI (Pages ) [ Original Images ] [ Expand Contents ] Chap. 2 PELE (Pages ) [ Original Images ] [ Expand Contents ] Chap.

3 OTHER LEGENDS OF THE ISLAND OF. HAWAIIAN LEGENDS OF GHOSTS and GHOST-GODS collected and translated from the Hawaiian by W. WESTERVELT Boston, Ellis Press [] Title Page Contents Foreword Introduction Pronunciation Part I I.

The Ghost of Wahaula Temple II. Maluae and the Under-world III. A Giant's Rock-Throwing. The following is a series of books of Hawaiian mythology, folkore, and legends by W.D. Westervelt from the turn of the 20th Century. Although Westervelt often wrote in a romanticized style, the folklore is genuine.

Legends of Maui by W.D. Westervelt [] A collection of Hawaiian and Polynesian legends about the culture hero, Maui. Pele by Herb Kane. Photo by Prayitno of via flickr CC Pele Goddess (Goddess of Fire & Volcano Goddess) Perhaps the most famous goddess in Hawaiian mythology, Pele is the goddess of fire and the volcano goddess.

Due to her fiery temper and attempted seduction of her sister Na-maka-o-Kaha’i’s husband, her father Kane banished Pele from her home, leaving her to sail the earth. Index of all grants issued by the Hawaiian government previous to Ma = Papa kuhikuhi o na apana aina a pau i kuaiia e ke aupuni Hawaii, mamua aku o ka la 31 o Maraki, by Hawaii.

Surveyor : Dore Minatodani. The Legends and Myths of Hawaii, by David Kalakaua, has the subtitle “The Fables And Folklore Of A Strange People.” Published in by David Kalakaua, the penultimate Hawaiian monarch, he tells the story of his people from ancient times to the early contact with by: 9.

What are some of the best book on Hawaiian legends. Hawaiian Culture. I have looked online and i can find only academic historical books about the God and ghost that seem out of touch. I am looking for more good story telling book that tell the story and legends of.

This is a collection of lore related to the Polynesian culture-hero, Maui, particularly his labors in creating the world. The book also includes some myths about Hina, Maui's mother, and several tales local to the Hawaiian islands.The Legend of the Night Marchers The retelling of spooky ghost tales has been a favorite form of entertainment and an important cultural link in Hawaii since ancient times.

Ghostly images or haunting acts have been reported in old buildings, deep valleys, sacred burial sites, ancient temple sites (called heiau), forested areas, beaches and lava.Hawaiian Myths and Legends» The Legend of Kamalo and the Shark God; The Legend of Kamalo and the Shark God.

Long ago on the island of Molokai lived Kupa, the high chief, and Kamalo, one of his priests. Kamalo had two sons, who had great courage and accomplished great feats of daring. Kupa had a house constructed in the Mapulehu valley, which.